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Radio Frequency Tracking Helps Health System Slice Costs

UC San Diego Health System saw huge cost savings after implementing the technology but privacy issues could stall widespread application by Peter Phung Concern over the rising cost of health care is an ongoing issue heightened by harsh economic times and record unemployment. Federal legislation passed to provide economic assistance to hospitals; however UC San Diego Health System is scrutinizing within to reduce operating costs. After implementing radio frequency identification (RFID) technology in 2006 to track certain mobile medical devices, the health system obtained a return on investment in just three months by reducing inventory leasing costs and search times.1…

What is Web 3.0?

A new wave of Web applications could take over many tasks but developers must offer ways to manage the risks by Jonathan Minder Imagine you want to book a vacation. After you indicate your desire via voice or text, your mobile Internet device (MID) goes to work. Without further effort, you receive flight and hotel recommendations based on your known preferences. Once you make a few core decisions, machines do the rest, making reservations, payment arrangements and coordinating with anyone joining you on the adventure. This example represents the reduction of human participation in mundane tasks — the promise of…

San Diego’s Stem Cell-Induced Business

State politics and a strong science sector in the region are poised to create a surge of novel stem cell therapies to previously uncontrollable diseases by Joshua Rutenberg, Ph.D. In 2004, the California electorate voted resoundingly in favor of Proposition 71, the California Stem Cell Research and Cures Act. Along with establishing a constitutional right to study stem cells in California, the act institutionalized the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) to distribute $3 billion to researchers and facilities throughout the state. The purpose was to advance embryonic and adult stem cell research, pursue therapies for unmet medical needs and…

U.S. Export to India: Consumer Culture

by Richard Woodbridge Last summer the world’s largest retailer, Walmart Stores Inc., made its grand entry into the Indian market. In a joint venture with Indian telecom giant Bharti Enterprises Ltd., Walmart opened the doors to its first Indian retail supply store in the northern state of Punjab. Although Walmart has been sourcing products from India for years, this launch reflected a growing paradigm shift within one of the world’s fastest growing economies. India is becoming a global consumer. As the economic crisis tightened its grip on many Western economies, India’s $1.2 trillion gross domestic product was growing strong at…

The Future of Sony

A Conversation with Stan Glasgow by Juli Iacuaniello Sony has been a strong supporter of and key business partner to the Rady School since its inception. We thought it fitting, then, to interview Stan Glasgow, president and COO of Sony Electronics, not only for his commitment to the Rady School, but also because the innovation and entrepreneurial spirit at Sony complements the values espoused by the Rady School. In our interview, Stan discussed the industry, future innovations and how Sony is changing its strategy in response to the current economic situation. Stan’s perspective reflects his 30 years of experience working…

Big Shoes to Fill

  How CEO transitions benefit from internal-external candidates by Brent Applegate Stroll down the halls of the San Diego headquarters of Gen-Probe, a developer of medical diagnostic tests, and you’ll find huge photo collages, handmade and framed, lining its walls. They chronicle the company’s history through scenes of company parties and events. Hairstyles and fashions change over time, but one constant through it all is the tall and distinguished long-time CEO, Hank Nordhoff. But in 2006 when Mr. Nordhoff began to discuss retiring, Gen-Probe’s board of directors faced the challenge of selecting his successor. Gen-Probe’s dilemma is becoming a fixture…

In Response – Harry Markowitz Comments on Business & Pscyhology

QUESTIONS DEVELOPED BY DANY KITISHIAN, FT ’09 IN COLLABORATION WITH CRAIG R.M. MCKENZIE Q. Are psychological factors currently important in explaining investors’ unwillingness to hold stocks? We know that many professional investors are sitting on piles of cash and are hesitant to dive into stocks at the moment. Are professional investors, like private equity or hedge funds, as affected by psychology as small investors are? A. Clearly investors are worried about the stock market, as is reasonable considering its recent declines and volatility, as well as the daily dose of bad news. This concern is translated into selling pressures which…

Business & Psychology

THE GROWING TREND OF JUDGMENT AND DECISION MAKING by Craig R.M. Mckenzie Psychology is the scientific study of human behavior, so it should come as no surprise that psychology has been employed in business settings for a long time. Experimental psychology began in 1879, and soon after that – in 1911 – Coca-Cola hired psychologist Harry Hollingworth to conduct laboratory experiments to see whether, as alleged by the U.S. government, the caffeine in CocaCola syrup was deleterious to human mental and motor performance. It wasn’t. Since then, the role of psychology in business has expanded and evolved, but its relevance has…

Is the U.S. following in Japan’s footsteps?

by Tetsuo Mizunuma English edited by Sam Alter, ft’10 Is history repeating itself? When U.S. land prices started falling in summer 2006, most Americans remained optimistic and thought this would only impact the housing industry. However, as buzz words like subprime lending and securities fraud appeared in the media, Americans began realizing how grave the condition of the economy really was. As the recession deepened, researchers recalled Japan’s bitter “lost decade” of the 1990s and discovered striking similarities. Takafumi Sato, commissioner of the Financial Services Agency of Japan, summarized the similarities at a global symposium held in Tokyo last October, saying that irresponsible lending was widespread previous to…

Medical Tourism

A solution to the healthcare crisis? by Matthew Dunphy With President Obama coming to power amidst promises of change, much of life in America may face a transition, including its healthcare. The debate on the rising cost of healthcare is decades long, and the problem is only getting worse. What better time, then, to evaluate and consider some legitimate options? While not a panacea, medical tourism is a potential solution. Outsourcing in any field often gets a bad rap. People worry about the quality of care received in overseas hospitals and question whether this actually saves money. But, as an owner of a medical tourism company since…