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Keeping Pace With Moore’s Law

by Aung Kyaw Myo and Prarthana Srikanth On May 30, 2013, Dutch microelectronics firm ASML completed its $3.7 billion cash-and-stock acquisition of San Diego-based Cymer. The deal – financed in part by industry leaders Intel, Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co., and Samsung – could prove pivotal in the development of the next generation of microprocessor fabrication technology. At stake is industry leadership in the face of upstart technologies and the continued exponential growth in processing power dictated by Moore’s Law. During the 21st century, historic advancements in telecommunications have spurred change on the macro level. According to a recent study by…

Predictive Patterns in Financial Markets

by Allan Timmermann Ever wondered why it is so difficult to forecast stock prices, movements in exchange rates, or the direction of the gold market? It is certainly not for lack of trying. Legions of professional fund managers, institutional investors, laymen, and market gurus are constantly scouring for any empirical evidence, news story, mathematical model, or computer algorithm that might give them an edge in profiting from higher returns by identifying predictable patterns in financial payoffs. This quest for predicting future stock, oil, or gold prices will only get more intense in a world with big data. After the recent…

San Diego’s Unrelenting Philanthropist

by Drew Beal “How many peoples’ lives have been affected positively – that’s where I get my jollies,” said Ernest Rady, founding donor of the Rady School of Management, from across a mammoth desk in the executive office at his firm, American Assets Trust (AAT), on a recent Tuesday. Mr. Rady had just returned that morning from a week in Europe. The Rady School of Management’s founding donor hadn’t been on vacation. In fact, barring the occasional golf trip, Mr. Rady isn’t really the vacationing type. AAT, which in 2011 underwent a $564 million IPO, today controls more than 5.8…

The Next Decade at Rady

by Robert Sullivan July 1, 2003, was the Rady School of Management’s inaugural date – it is our reference point for when our community imagined a possible graduate business school at UC San Diego. “Imagined” is a true descriptor of the times, since our school launched with very few resources and even fewer commitments. Through the remainder of 2003, a clearer picture of our unique business school on the La Jolla “mesa” emerged – with considerable input from prospective supporters and the greater San Diego community. In short, our new business school at UC San Diego would be characterized by…

University Partnerships With Corporations

by Michael Kalichman The medical challenges we face are numerous and generally wellknown. Just a few examples include heart disease, cancer, respiratory disease, and Alzheimer’s disease. From an altruistic perspective, there is a great deal to be gained from finding new and improved methods to diagnose, treat, and possibly prevent or cure these diseases. And from an economic perspective, there is clearly a great deal to be gained from finding those new and improved methods. Both academia and industry have roles in making this possible. Just two of the many local examples of such collaborations include a partnership between UC…

Urban Vibrancy

by Christopher Parsons, Faculty In his influential book “The World is Flat,” New York Times columnist Thomas L. Friedman credited technology with a “flattening” of the economic landscape. Innovations like the Internet were making it virtually costless to transmit information, allowing people located across the world to communicate as though they were across the room. This transformation, Friedman argues, would eventually render physical distance (if not borders) irrelevant and, in so doing, redefine the concept of location – one based less on geography and more by position in a global lattice of information. Perhaps the greatest strength of Friedman’s claim…

Assigning Property Rights to Human Tissue

by Marcella Bothwell, MBA ’14, and Erez Yoeli, Lecturer Biotechnology researchers sometimes use human tissue samples collected from patients during necessary procedures to develop immortal cell lines. These cell lines are used in the research and development of drugs and other treatments for diseases. These immortal cell lines can be immensely profitable for their developers, but patients have not always shared in the wealth created with their tissue. The best-known case is that of Henrietta Lacks, the impoverished originator of the immortal cell line “HeLa.” Lacks’ tissue was obtained during her treatment for cervical cancer, and while she and her…

Industry Analysis: The Sources of Profit for San Diego’s Privatized Prisons

by Elizabeth Liner While the rest of America has been mired in economic volatility, the prison-building industry has been holding steady. As of 2011, the U.S.’s correctional system incarcerates one of every 107 adults1 and contains the world’s largest prison population.2 With an in-prison population of more than 133,000, California has the nation’s third-largest number of people incarcerated. This population size, compounded with a 65.1 percent recidivism rate, has led to huge overcrowding in California prisons. Consequently, courts have ruled that the state failed to deliver adequate mental or physical health care to the prisoners. In an effort to address…

MYANMAR and the Myth of Cheap Land

by Aung Kyaw Myo, MBA ’13 Since 2011, the world has been closely watching a small nation in southeast Asia emerge from decades of economic sanctions and military rule. Formerly an outcast state, Myanmar appears to be on a steady path toward rehabilitation and economic development. The opportunities for foreign investment are plentiful in a country with a 2010 per-capita gross domestic product of $876.1 But the unique conditions on the ground may challenge basic assumptions about investing in emerging markets. Myanmar has only recently earned the label “emerging” after significant reforms, starting with the installation of a democratically elected…

Powering the Trend in Renewable Energy Credits

by Andrew Zorko, MBA ’14 Over the past decade, companies’ desire to become more environmentally friendly has grown. For example, California-based Kendall-Jackson Winery has chosen to purchase all of its power through renewable energy sources. Not only are the business operations run on renewable energy, but the winery also purchases 100 percent renewable energy for the homes of all of its employees. This is a first for any company and has earned it an EPA Green Power Leadership Award in 2011.1 Kendall-Jackson Winery accomplishes this through the use of renewable energy credits (RECs). A REC is a certificate that represents…