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University Partnerships With Corporations

by Michael Kalichman The medical challenges we face are numerous and generally wellknown. Just a few examples include heart disease, cancer, respiratory disease, and Alzheimer’s disease. From an altruistic perspective, there is a great deal to be gained from finding new and improved methods to diagnose, treat, and possibly prevent or cure these diseases. And from an economic perspective, there is clearly a great deal to be gained from finding those new and improved methods. Both academia and industry have roles in making this possible. Just two of the many local examples of such collaborations include a partnership between UC…

Urban Vibrancy

by Christopher Parsons, Faculty In his influential book “The World is Flat,” New York Times columnist Thomas L. Friedman credited technology with a “flattening” of the economic landscape. Innovations like the Internet were making it virtually costless to transmit information, allowing people located across the world to communicate as though they were across the room. This transformation, Friedman argues, would eventually render physical distance (if not borders) irrelevant and, in so doing, redefine the concept of location – one based less on geography and more by position in a global lattice of information. Perhaps the greatest strength of Friedman’s claim…

Assigning Property Rights to Human Tissue

by Marcella Bothwell, MBA ’14, and Erez Yoeli, Lecturer Biotechnology researchers sometimes use human tissue samples collected from patients during necessary procedures to develop immortal cell lines. These cell lines are used in the research and development of drugs and other treatments for diseases. These immortal cell lines can be immensely profitable for their developers, but patients have not always shared in the wealth created with their tissue. The best-known case is that of Henrietta Lacks, the impoverished originator of the immortal cell line “HeLa.” Lacks’ tissue was obtained during her treatment for cervical cancer, and while she and her…

MYANMAR and the Myth of Cheap Land

by Aung Kyaw Myo, MBA ’13 Since 2011, the world has been closely watching a small nation in southeast Asia emerge from decades of economic sanctions and military rule. Formerly an outcast state, Myanmar appears to be on a steady path toward rehabilitation and economic development. The opportunities for foreign investment are plentiful in a country with a 2010 per-capita gross domestic product of $876.1 But the unique conditions on the ground may challenge basic assumptions about investing in emerging markets. Myanmar has only recently earned the label “emerging” after significant reforms, starting with the installation of a democratically elected…

Powering the Trend in Renewable Energy Credits

by Andrew Zorko, MBA ’14 Over the past decade, companies’ desire to become more environmentally friendly has grown. For example, California-based Kendall-Jackson Winery has chosen to purchase all of its power through renewable energy sources. Not only are the business operations run on renewable energy, but the winery also purchases 100 percent renewable energy for the homes of all of its employees. This is a first for any company and has earned it an EPA Green Power Leadership Award in 2011.1 Kendall-Jackson Winery accomplishes this through the use of renewable energy credits (RECs). A REC is a certificate that represents…

The Risks of Avoiding a Debate on Gender Differences

by Moshe Hoffman, Postdoctoral Scholar, and Erez Yoeli, Lecturer Men are more likely to own risky stocks. They are more likely to choose competitive careers. And they are more likely to bargain aggressively for their starting salaries. The evidence is overwhelming: In virtually every setting ever studied – in laboratory experiments where people choose between gambles and empirical studies where retirement funds or career choices are analyzed – men take more risk than women.1,2 We know, we know. All of us are brought up to believe that men and women are the same, and we want them to be the…

Are Short-Sellers Really the Bad Guys?

by Joseph Engelberg, Faculty With crises come blame, and following the 2008 financial crisis, there has been plenty of blame laid at the feet of short-sellers. It did not take long for regulators to pass judgment on these traders. In the midst of the crisis, short-selling bans were implemented in the U.S., the U.K., Japan, Canada, Spain, Australia, France, Germany, Italy, Belgium, Greece, Ireland, the Netherlands, and South Korea. And around the world, the heavy scrutiny continues to this day. What is it about short-selling that attracts that level of condemnation? For starters, a short-seller in the stock market sells…

The Ethical Imperative: More Important Than Ever

by Blair Sadler, Lecturer It seems particularly timely for the Rady Business Journal to devote an issue to the topic of ethical behavior in organizations. In today’s corporate world, the landscape is littered with examples of self-serving, irresponsible behavior – Enron, British Petroleum, big banks, and investment firms, to name a few. The nonprofit sector is hardly immune. The sexual abuse crises involving Penn State University, the Catholic Church, and the Boy Scouts of America provide vivid examples of the lack of effective, ethical leadership. A defining moment in the history of any organization is how it responds to a highly…

CEO Tanya Maslach: Her Path to Entrepreneurship

by Danielle Berman, MBA ’12 Tanya Maslach is the founder and CEO of GOTRIbal, a unique organization dedicated to connecting and empowering women through endurance sports. She was recently nominated by the San Diego Business Journal as one of the “Most Admired CEOs.” It is easy to see why GOTRIbal, which launched in 2010, has since captured the hearts of women across the globe who are looking to build relationships through healthy, active lifestyles. As Maslach put it, GOTRIbal isn’t about “racing.” It’s about journeys that positively impact women, their families and their communities. Below, Maslach discusses her success as…

Unpacking the Golden Parachute

by Carlos Uribe, MBA ’12 At the Rady School of Management, certain professors tend to answer crucial questions with the response, “It depends.” This is an interesting approach, as it basically says, “Well, there’s no one cookie-cutter solution to any issue; no one answer solves all problems; and many factors have to be considered, weighed and accounted for.” It also implies that we should draw our optimal strategy from the goals and resources we have at hand. Different approaches to those two factors — goals and resources, that is — will render varying conclusions. As an example, dissatisfaction with the…