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Protector Brewery: A Lesson in Following Passion to Discover Innovation

Protector Brewery: A Lesson in Following Passion to Discover Innovation [1] by Louis H. “Tra” Calisch, III   Innovation is a key factor in developing a successful startup, but it is often times elusive.  Many believe that inspiration comes randomly, defined by the “Aha!” moment.  However, a critical observation by Peter Drucker in the 1985 Harvard Business Review insists that innovation more commonly derives from methodically analyzing your environment for opportunity.[2]  Beyond this process is a factor critical to entrepreneurs.  Innovation requires passion.  One need only look to their local craft brewery to see why. Craft brewing was an innovation in the…

California is Fertile Ground for Music Instrument Innovation

By G. Bryan Cornwall, PhD, PEng (MBA 2018) Some of our most profound memories are linked with music: whether it is your first drive, first date, first kiss, or first anything, there is almost always a song that goes with it. Dick Clark is credited with the claim that “Music is the soundtrack of your life.” Music is art, music is emotion, music is life, and as noted by David Byrne, the former front-man of the band “Talking Heads” in his book: “How Music Works”, music is business [1]. For most of human history music was enjoyed in social venues…

Integrative Medicine: The Health Care of the Future is Happening Now

by Lauray MacElhern The U.S. medical system, although referred to as “health care” is largely one of disease care, a status quo that threatens our country’s economic and societal well-being. An inside-out transformation of this system, that teaches and encourages prevention and wellness, not just disease management, is desperately needed. According to the latest World Health Organization data1, the United States ranks 46 out of 48 countries in terms of “health care efficiency” – a calculation derived from life expectancy and health care cost per capita. We spend 18 percent of GDP per capita on health care – the highest…

QUALCOMM Unleashes the Dragon

by Saurabh Bajaj and amit Rai Toward the end of 2012, marketing managers at Qualcomm, the world’s leading mobile chipset provider by revenue, were reevaluating the progress they had made in a new business-toconsumer marketing initiative. Qualcomm had gone to great lengths to market its Snapdragon system on a chip (SoC) technology. The company was hoping to create a signature product in the eyes of mobile users, who for the most part did not know the role Qualcomm technology played in their devices. In December of 2011, the San Diego-based company had gone so far as to re-christen its namesake…

Keeping Pace With Moore’s Law

by Aung Kyaw Myo and Prarthana Srikanth On May 30, 2013, Dutch microelectronics firm ASML completed its $3.7 billion cash-and-stock acquisition of San Diego-based Cymer. The deal – financed in part by industry leaders Intel, Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co., and Samsung – could prove pivotal in the development of the next generation of microprocessor fabrication technology. At stake is industry leadership in the face of upstart technologies and the continued exponential growth in processing power dictated by Moore’s Law. During the 21st century, historic advancements in telecommunications have spurred change on the macro level. According to a recent study by…

Powering the Trend in Renewable Energy Credits

by Andrew Zorko, MBA ’14 Over the past decade, companies’ desire to become more environmentally friendly has grown. For example, California-based Kendall-Jackson Winery has chosen to purchase all of its power through renewable energy sources. Not only are the business operations run on renewable energy, but the winery also purchases 100 percent renewable energy for the homes of all of its employees. This is a first for any company and has earned it an EPA Green Power Leadership Award in 2011.1 Kendall-Jackson Winery accomplishes this through the use of renewable energy credits (RECs). A REC is a certificate that represents…

Sparking Innovation

by Ben Doctor During his 2011 State of the Union address, President Obama called attention to America’s proclivity for innovation: “What we can do, what America does better than anyone, is spark the creativity and imagination of our people.” President Obama praised the visionary leadership of Americans such as Edison and the Wright brothers and of companies such as Google and Facebook. He proclaimed that “in America, innovation doesn’t just change our lives. It’s how we make a living.” Of course, re-sparking a surge in American innovation is easier said than done. An Incubator for Fresh Ideas When President Obama…

Wireless Technology Poised to Transform Health Care

New companies continue to develop exciting applications, but will consumers and the health care field accept the costs and risks to privacy? by Andrea Jackson After a decade driven by the work of a small group of early-stage companies and visionaries within the health care and telecommunications worlds, wireless health exploded into mainstream consciousness in 2009. Despite the rapid increase in awareness of its value, proliferation of supporting technology and industry optimism about the potential market, significant challenges stand in the way of widespread adoption. Wireless technology can enable dramatic change in the way health care is delivered, but health…

Innovating Our Way Out of a Crisis

Can research on operations and innovation benefit (University of) California? by Vish Krishnan, Sc.D. How quickly time flies. It was two years ago that Maria Shriver, California’s first lady, headlined a rally for soon-to-be President Barack Obama at UCLA with the following words, “If Barack Obama were a state, he’d be California. I mean think about it. Diverse. Open. Smart. Independent. Bucks tradition. Innovative. Inspiring Dreamer. Leader.” That was a powerful endorsement of Obama’s candidacy and a nice pitch for California. The description resonated around the world because it is not far from the image of the state both its…

Radio Frequency Tracking Helps Health System Slice Costs

UC San Diego Health System saw huge cost savings after implementing the technology but privacy issues could stall widespread application by Peter Phung Concern over the rising cost of health care is an ongoing issue heightened by harsh economic times and record unemployment. Federal legislation passed to provide economic assistance to hospitals; however UC San Diego Health System is scrutinizing within to reduce operating costs. After implementing radio frequency identification (RFID) technology in 2006 to track certain mobile medical devices, the health system obtained a return on investment in just three months by reducing inventory leasing costs and search times.1…